Home is where my pasta machine is

by Janice Nigro A plane is that modern vehicle of irony, speeding you through the air at times to areas of the Earth that might still be in the stone age. Or at least into another apparent universe where we don’t understand the language, we don’t look like anyone else, and we don’t have the…

Making “untradition” the tradition of Christmas

Turkey or ham for dinner in the USA. Pinekjøtt or lutefisk in Norway. Gathering of families usually at the home of the grandmother and grandfather. Yes, we are stuck on tradition, truly stuck if you look forward to eating fruitcake or maybe lutefisk each year for Christmas. I remember a few traditions about Christmases growing…

The seven-year scientific manuscript

by Janice Nigro My colleagues and I just submitted a scientific paper we have been working on for seven years. Seven years. It’s hard for me to admit that. Maybe I shouldn’t admit it. A lot can happen in seven years. Babies have been born, and people spread around the western world like they were…

How far would you go?

by Janice Nigro It was my fifth airport in 4 days of travel. And I still hadn’t arrived at my destination. “Is this a vacation?” I asked myself. Living in LA, I can’t cry that I have poor access to a major airport hub. I was on my way to another diving adventure. This time…

Coloring outside the lines in science writing

by Janice Nigro A great irony in science is how generic we scientists often write about it. We use clichéd lines. “To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to show X…” Or “However, X still remains unknown.” Or my favorite, “Such and such cancer is the most aggressive tumor type in…